Monday, October 10, 2005

Gladstone Street

5 comments:

Lisa said...

The only thing I know about this street is that apparently there is a little spot without a proper parking limit sign - just completely unmarked but without yellow unbroken lines or anything to stop you parking there.

One of my colleagues in a previous job said it's her little tricky spot to park when she needs to drive into the city and not attract a parking fine all day. She said once she did get a fine but when contested in court the city council admitted defeat.

Deirdre said...

I don't know whether you'll get this comment, seeing it's so late, but let's see.

This shot is beautiful. I straight away thought of Fowlers Lane I - they have the same sort of squished-flat quality, a kind of dreaminess or something, which is just lovely.

Anyway, I've been away from this site too long. You're doing some great work. Nothing better than a rainy Sunday morning wandering through your archives. Happy happy :)

Mark said...

Squished-flat - I see what you mean. Most of my photos are taken straight-on, very little perspective. For some reason, I don't like perspective. I think perspective can give a sense of continuation, of the subject matter going on beyond the borders of the photo. I think I prefer to contain my subjects in their own little space that stops the subject from going on. I mean, of course it goes on outside of the photo but I guess you can't see it going on like you can when you have perspective.

Glad you're still enjoying my photos...

Deirdre said...

You're trying to arrest our gaze? "Stop - Look - Here, now!"

What you say is interesting, because a project like this kind of suggests a documentary style (illustrating the story of the city), but your pictures are each a little story in themselves.

Deirdre said...

Sorry if it's not clear: I meant what you're doing and the way you're doing it is unusual and good. You could have started with the city as a whole and then illustrated the components, but it seems to me you're doing a whole series of portraits, each an end it itself while still fitting into the overall picture of Adelaide through the location names and maps and stories from people like Lisa (the stories add layers the camera can't get to). You're not just illustrating locations, is what I mean. You're giving each place a life of it's own, and that's a good thing.